After The Monkees… Then What?

Magazine: Tiger Beat Presents Davy Jones
Editor: Ralph Benner
Published:
Publisher: Laufer Publishing Co.
Pages: 48–49, 53

Davy Jones

To Davy the future is a wild promise, chock full of new projects, creative explosions, all the things that will force him to become even greater and better known in his field. While he loves The Monkees, he still keeps a realistic eye on the future; and part of that future is starting to take shape right now. Let Davy tell you about his own dreams—and realities. Let him tell you what will happen to The Monkees, and most important, what will happen to Davy Jones.

Davy talks about the future

Davy Jones

“After we finish this, there’s going to be a thousand things we can do, whether it’s with the group or individually. We might make a movie all together. Or here’s another idea that we think interesting and we’re seriously considering: Each one of us will make a separate movie, and we’ll pick our own special one to suit our own personality.

“But we’ve talked about it and we do not want to go into another “Hard Day’s Night” starring The Monkees—with all the fast cuts and the jumping around. The kids have seen two or three years of that and so it’s got to be something more. We’re even looking for movies now, and we want each of them to be totally different. After all, we’re each as different as people can get.

“And we have to be realistic. The Monkees could go on for maybe a couple of more years. And maybe it could go on a year after that, but I doubt it. Because everybody’s very tired. It’s not that we’re going to end, it’s just that the TV show will change. Maybe we’ll do an hour special every two weeks. Now we’re open to do things like that. With the experience The Monkees have given us we’ve all grown in the last two and a half years, to the point where we could handle something like that. I’m thinking of something in the form of The Smothers Brothers type variety show. We’d just have to have good acts, that’s all.”

Always a Monkee

Davy Jones

“I’ll work with those guys as long as they want to work with me. I wouldn’t want to break up on my own. I want to work with them because I’m better—and that’s even if I do go off and do a movie on my own. Of course, as soon as people hear David Jones they’re going to say David Jones of The Monkees, and that’s no matter what any of us do. So The Monkees are always going to be there for the next 20 years. Paul McCartney writes a score for a movie and it’s Paul McCartney of the Beatles.

Davy Jones

“But if I do act I want people to see what I really am like. There are plenty of actors who can play ‘character’ roles. But I act the way I really am. I act on the screen as I would at home. Like when we’re in the kitchen joking around—it’s the same in the studio. For instance, when we try to pull a horse into the kitchen to hide it from the landlord in one of our scenes, why I’d hide my horse out in the kitchen too—I’d do crazy things like that. In fact, the only one who isn’t as he comes off in the Monkees is Peter because he’s not dumb, he’s very intelligent.

“Don’t get me wrong, I can and probably will play different parts… character parts… but let’s face it, as soon as somebody sees me in a movie or something they’re going to say, ‘There’s David Jones of The Monkees’ and wait for me to start fooling around.”

A new musical career

Davy Jones

“Now we’ve finally gotten into the bag that we want to, musically, and we’re going to come out with a brand new album that is typically us. This is the way we’re going to work it. Each one of us will produce three songs—the three types of songs we really want to do as individuals. For example, my songs are going to be Broadway show type numbers, Micky is going to be singing James Brown type songs, Mike will be doing Country and Western stuff and Peter will be doing folk songs.

Davy Jones

“I feel that we’ve got to get into another bag because music is dropping at the moment. It needs something. I’ve been asked to produce for other people, and there are some other record companies who’ve asked me to produce for them—which is a groovy thing. What’s great, and I’m talking about the future, is that I can produce something, and if a record company doesn’t like it, fine. I can put my own money into it. I just want to get across what I feel to the kids.”

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